Low Carb & Keto Lemon Cheesecake Recipe


If life gives you lemons, make a lemon cheesecake out of them. And best of all one without sugar and in low carb, with 2,4g carbohydrates per 100g!

Low Carb & Keto Lemon Cheesecake


The cake is really simple and super delicious!

It is 100% Low-Carb & Keto, gluten-free & without added sugar!

Ingredients:

For the bottom
  • 3 eggs
  • 80 Almond flour
  • 20 Coconut flour
  • 60g -80g Erythritol
  • 60 butter
For the quark filling
  • 5 eggs
  • 160g Erythritol
  • 650g quark
  • Juice & peel of a lemon

Keto Lemon Cheesecake Recipe

  1. Put all the ingredients for the base in a mixing bowl and knead everything until it becomes a smooth dough.
  2. Now take your baking tin and line it completely with baking paper.
    Spread the dough evenly over the entire bottom of the baking tin. You don't have to form an edge.
  3. Bake the base for about 10 minutes at 175 degrees circulating air.
  4. First grate the zest of the lemon with a fine grater and then squeeze out the juice.
    Make sure it is an organic lemon, because you want to eat the peel 😉
  5. Now put all the ingredients for the quark filling in a bowl and whisk everything until a homogeneous viscous mass is obtained.
  6. Pour this mixture completely onto the baked base.
  7. Bake the cake on the middle shelf for another 30 - 40 minutes.
    Each oven is a bit different, so watch the cake after 30 minutes and take it out as soon as it starts getting dark 🙂
  8. Allow the cake to cool for 2-3 hours and set before taking it out of the tin.
Low Carb Lemon Cheesecake Recipe


Tip: If you put some lemon slices as decoration on it, it looks particularly pretty!

Nutritional values per 100g :

Per 100g
Calorific value                                                  KJ / kcal
KJ                                                                      684.7
kcal                                                                    163.7
Fat                                                                      11.8
of which saturated                                              5.6
Carbohydrates                                                    13,3
of which sugar                                                    2.2
of which polyols                                                 10.9
Protein                                                                10,7
Salt                                                                      0,0

We are very happy when many people imitate our recipes 🙂
Share them with other ketarians and those who want to become ketarians! Please remember to link or mention in it. Developing recipes is a lot of work and it would be great if this can be traced back to us!

Low Carb and Keto Lemon Cheesecake Recipe

5 Important Changes You Should Make To Your Diet When You Reach 40


Are you about to reach 40 and you’re worried about whether you need to make significant changes to your life?

5 Important Changes You Should Make To Your Diet When You Reach 40


Age shouldn’t be an impediment or a motive to care for your body. For precisely this reason, you should always care for yourself. However, there are a few changes you should make to your diet once your reach 40.

After 40, not only is it more difficult to lose weight, but also certain health problems can start that you need to control.

Today, we’ve prepared a list of the changes you should make. (Don’t worry; they’re simple!)

1. Increase your calcium intake

Increase your calcium intake


Due to the fact that your production of estrogen reduces after age 40, your bones will have greater difficulty in absorbing calcium from food.

The problem with this is that it increases your risk of suffering from osteoporosis and fractures that could have consequences for the future.

The ideal scenario is to ingest around 1000 milligrams of calcium a day.

Some options to get it include:

  • Cheese, which contain between 470 and 850 milligrams of calcium in a 100 gram piece (depending on the type of cheese). Remember, however, that when including it in your meals you should avoid adding more fats.
  • Almonds, which provide 250 milligrams of calcium in 100 grams of almonds. It is important not to consume almonds excessively, because they are high in carbohydrates and fats.
  • Yogurt. 100 grams of yogurt gives you between 127 and 180 milligrams of calcium. When it comes to choosing your yogurt, go for a natural one that’s as free as possible from sweeteners. Another good alternative is to make your own yogurt at home. This will enable you to make it in different ways and with different flavors.

2. Eat more protein


When you reach 40, you also need to increase your protein intake, because our muscle mass decreases as we grow older. This means that you can lose weight without wanting to, leaving room for more fat to accumulate.

Ideally, you should include around 30 grams of protein in each meal.

The best options are:

  • Soy, which contains 37 grams of protein per 100 grams. The ideal option is to eat the bean itself, but if you don’t like it or you can’t get it, try tofu or soy milk.
  • Pine nuts, which provide 14 grams of protein in every 100 grams. However, avoid eating large quantities of pine nuts at once because they are high in fats.
  • Chicken. We get 30 grams of protein from every 100 grams of skinless lean chicken. The best way to eat it is in meals with vegetables and the least amount of fat possible.

3. Reduce your sodium intake

Reduce your sodium intake


Inflammation and bloating is a common problem upon reaching your forties and during the menopause. To reduce how often and how seriously this happens, it is a good idea to eat little sodium.

The easiest way to achieve this is to reduce your salt intake. If you’ve already reduced your use of salt in cooking and inflammation continues to be a problem, check the labels of the products you tend to eat.

The majority contain sodium among their ingredients, so you should seek out healthier options or reduce the portions you eat.

Pay special attention to the nutritional information label. There, you can see the quantity of sodium that the product contains per portion and the weight of a portion.

4. Add more antioxidants to your diet


You’ve probably already heard a lot about the benefits of antioxidants in the body.

When you reach 40, you’ll start to experience problems related to aging, like skin problems and clicking joints.

To reduce the problem, try to include:

  • Peppers
  • Blackberries
  • Broccoli
  • Strawberries
  • Green tea
  • Dark chocolate

5. Monitor your vitamin B12 intake

Monitor your vitamin B12 intake


When you reach 40, your body starts to have nerve problems and problems with blood cell production. These two situations are reversed with the consumption of enough vitamin B12.

An adult requires around 2.4 micrograms of this vitamin per day, and you can get it from dairy products, fish and eggs.

Other changes you should make when you reach 40


As well as your diet, it’s also important to improve your lifestyle to ensure that the efforts you make with your diet reap rewards.

The main changes are:

  • Make changes to your exercise plan to adapt it to the characteristics of your body. If you’ve noticed joint problems, choose more gentle exercises.
  • Have a medical check-up every 6 months. If you’ve always had good health you might not visit your doctor very often. When you reach 40, it’s important to do so more often to rule out the appearance of diseases.
  • Exercise often. Keep moving as much as you can. Even just a short walk or getting up and stretching a bit counts!

Do you already have these habits or do you need to adopt some into your life?

Fruits and Vegetables Protect the Heart


Although there was a suspicion that a high consumption of fruits and vegetables would be beneficial for cardiovascular health, it has been a study published in the prestigious European Heart Journal, which has been able to demonstrate this sufficiently. However, despite the forcefulness of their results, reasonable doubts about the nutritional properties of these foods with regard to their cardioprotective effect have not been dispelled.

Fruits and Vegetables Protect the Heart


The objective of the European Prospective Study on Nutrition, Cancer and Cardiovascular Disease (EPIC) was to verify a possible relationship between fruit and vegetable consumption and the incidence of ischemic cardiovascular disease and stroke.

For 8.4 years, 313,074 people of both sexes were monitored and observed in several European countries, including Spain. Participants were invited to consume at least eight daily servings of fruit and vegetables of 80 grams each. At the end of the study, it was found that the subjects, without a history of stroke or cardiovascular ischemic disease, had managed to reduce by 22% the risk of suffering a clinical episode affecting the coronary arteries (angina or infarction) or the cerebral arteries (ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke) in relation to another group of subjects with similar clinical characteristics in which the consumption of fruit and vegetables was significantly lower (less than three portions per day). It was concluded that for each piece of fruit and vegetable consumed per day, weighing 80 grams, a cumulative risk reduction of 4% was achieved.

How fruits and vegetables reduce cardiac and cerebrovascular events

The facts show that a high intake of fruits and vegetables does not reduce total cholesterol levels, nor does it lower LDL (bad cholesterol) or raise HDL (good cholesterol) levels, nor does it have any direct action on triglycerides. Consequently, it is not through a reduction in cholesterol that a diet rich in fruits and vegetables lowers rates of cardiovascular or cerebrovascular clinical episodes. This lack of causal link has led researchers to speculate on other factors that are enhanced by this type of food. Thus, a diet rich in fruits and vegetables increases potassium and magnesium concentrations, which protect against heart rhythm disorders, while reducing the intake of sodium whose association with high blood pressure is well established. In addition, the high concentration of antioxidants may play a protective role against ischemic vascular disease. On the other hand, the rich fibre content provided by this type of food favours intestinal transit and therefore reduces the chances of developing inflammatory phenomena, while competing with intestinal fat absorption. If this type of food is supplemented with nuts, rich in omega-3 and 6 acids, the protective factor of the vegetable diet is enhanced.

In short, although it is not clear what the mechanisms of action derived from the Mediterranean diet (rich in fruits and vegetables) are, the consequences are not only well known, but there is growing clinical and epidemiological evidence that these healthy eating habits provide undeniable protection against cardiovascular disease.


Indispensable food in the daily diet

Other good health campaigns recommend eating at least five pieces of fruit a day, as well as a vegetable or salad plate and about 40-50 grams of nuts (walnuts, hazelnuts or peanuts).

Let's accept as excellent these advices that, in addition, are easy to carry out in a country like Spain where the vegetable garden is so rich in this kind of products. However, it would be necessary to obtain financial aid from the health authorities in order to reduce prices and make fruit and vegetables into basic necessities so that they would be within the reach of the entire population. Similarly, it is highly desirable that vending machines for snacks, in which industrial bakery predominates, were replaced or supplemented with fresh fruit, and this is also mandatory in those dispensers near schools or children's areas.


Reference

Fruit and vegetable intake and mortality from ischaemic heart disease: results from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC)-Heart study